Proposed Sale of Stilo Corporation and notice of General Meeting

Stilo International hereby announces that a Circular has been sent to Shareholders earlier today detailing the proposed Sale of the entire issued share capital of Stilo Corporation to 000258076 Ontario Inc. (being a special purchase vehicle with which Bryan Tipper, a director of the Company, is connected).

The Circular sets out the terms of the Sale and incorporates a notice of a General Meeting to be held at the offices of RSM UK, 22-25 Farringdon Street, London EC4A 4AB on 9th February 2023 at 11.00 am at which a resolution to approve the Sale will be proposed.

Shareholders can download the Circular below:

 

Shareholder Circular

 

 

 


2022 Interim Results Now Available

We are pleased to announce that the 2022 Interim Results are now available. The password has been sent via email to all shareholders who have previously registered with us.

 

2022 Interim Results

 

If you are an existing shareholder and would like to otherwise request a copy of the accounts, or have follow-up questions that you would like to raise, then please contact us at [email protected].

 

 


2021 Accounts Now Available

We are pleased to announce that the 2021 Accounts are now available. The password has been sent via email to all shareholders who have registered with us on our website here.

 

2021 Accounts

 

If you have any follow-up questions that you would like to raise, then please contact us at [email protected].

 

 


Press Release - Release of Analyzer 1.0: Free Content Reuse Analysis Tool

Stilo International Announces Analyzer 1.0: Free Content Reuse Analysis Tool

OTTAWA, Ontario, November 1, 2021 – Stilo (https://www.stilo.com) is excited to announce a free content reuse analysis tool, Analyzer 1.0, that enables users to pinpoint cost savings for implementing a reuse strategy across an entire document corpus. Analyzer allows users to identify content reuse across multiple source formats (e.g. MS Word, FrameMaker, and HTML) by providing an interactive GUI and detailed graphical reports.

To begin, content is uploaded to the portal and immediately analyzed. The analysis looks for both exact and near matches, and will report separate results for paragraphs, tables, images, and spans. Upon completion, users will be provided with their very own custom portal in which they can analyze results, investigate opportunities, tailor cost figures, and export detailed reports.

“Reuse analysis is a critical step for many organizations investigating the move to structured content, and in particular, structured XML”, says Bryan Tipper, CEO of Stilo.  “With Analyzer, users now have access to a free tool that can report statistics such as exact matches, near matches, and most importantly, potential content reuse. In addition, an interactive sequence browser within Analyzer provides clarity on the number of content reuse opportunities and where those opportunities can be found”.

To get started with a free content reuse analysis, users should visit: https://www.stilo.com/analyzer/.

 

About Stilo International
Stilo develops tools to help organizations automate the conversion of content to XML and build XML content processing components integral to enterprise-level publishing solutions. Operating from offices in the UK and Canada, Stilo supports commercial publishers, technology companies and government agencies around the world in their pursuit of structured content. For more information, visit https://www.stilo.com/about.

Media Contact
Bryan Tipper
+1 (613) 745 4242
[email protected]

Related Links
https://www.stilo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Analyzer-1.0-Content-Reuse-Analysis-Summary-Concise.jpg
https://cdn.stilo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Analyzer-1.0-Content-Reuse-Analysis-Report-Concise.jpg
https://cdn.stilo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Analyzer-1.0-Content-Reuse-Analysis-Sequence-Browser-Concise.jpg

SOURCE: Stilo International

Free Conversion Offer

Upload your sample document (20-30 pages) and we will convert it to DITA free of charge!

We review the conversion results with you, and let you retain the output for your own testing purposes.

Request Now

WEBINAR | Analyzer 1.0 - Identifying Content Reuse

November 16, 2021 @ 11:00am EDT

Our Presenter:

TJ Dhaliwal | Technical Sales Product Specialist

Analyzer is an interactive platform that enables users to identify content reuse across multiple source formats, pinpoint potential cost savings, and generate compelling & detailed graphical reports.

In this webinar we will demonstrate how to analyze Word content, calculate & navigate reuse potential, and generate beautiful reports estimating cost savings.


2021 Interim Results Now Available

We are pleased to announce that the 2021 Interim Results are now available. The password has been sent via email to all shareholders who have registered with us on our website here.

 

2021 Interim Results

 

If you are an existing shareholder and would like to otherwise request a copy of the accounts, or have follow-up questions that you would like to raise, then please contact us at [email protected].

 

 


WEBINAR | Automatically Convert Content To DITA XML & Deduplicate Exact Topics

June 23, 2021 @ 11:00am EDT

Our Presenter:

TJ Dhaliwal | Technical Sales Product Specialist

Migrate is a well-established cloud service that enables technical authoring teams to convert content to DITA XML from source formats including HTML, Word, FrameMaker, RoboHelp, InDesign, DocBook, Flare, AuthorIt, MindTouch, Excel, XML and SGML. In version 4.0, we added the capability to identify and eliminate redundant topics as part of the conversion process.

In this webinar, we will quickly demonstrate how to automatically convert your content to DITA 1.3 and how this content can be automatically deduplicated using Migrate’s latest feature – Exact Topic Deduplication.


Facilitate Translation with Planning

 

By Peter Fournier
“Plan early, plan thoroughly”

Planning for translation

Joann Hackos, Grande Dame of DITA, claimed in 2011 that just switching to DITA could save 20% on translation costs. A competent Content Management System could easily save another 20% (Joann Hackos’ Keynote on DITA and Translation Management).

If you need translation or localization, DITA seems like a slam dunk decision. Might as well get started with DITA in English and develop the translation part later, yes?

No, don’t do that. You really must plan to include translation into your DITA workflow from the start or you can fail to deliver the expected cost savings promised at the start of the migration to DITA project.

 

Basic issues

The translation and localization industry has migrated to its own XML standards. There are several:

  • XLIFF (XML Localization Interchange File Format)
  • TMX (Translation Memory eXchange)
  • TBX (TermBase eXchange)
  • SRX (Segmentation Rules eXchange)
  • ITS (Segmentation Rules eXchange)
  • and no doubt others …

All of these standards play well with DITA but can also play very badly depending on the tools, workflow, CMS or CCMS and outside suppliers you will use in your implementation of DITA + translation.

This diagram shows some of the complexities involved in an integrated workflow.

Without translation the diagram looks more like this:

So, is this complexity of translation good news or bad news? It’s excellent news with proper planning. What are the steps required to achieve excellent results?

 

Step One: It’s been done before …

DITA plus translation has been done before. Seek out others who have already implemented the transition. You will find that there are many ways to approach the problem. Some of the ways will be similar to your situation, others won’t be, but the more people you talk to the more ideas you’ll have to work with.

 

Step Two: Talk to translation companies

Before talking with a translation company, you need to prepare a sample of your content, in DITA, that represents the full scope of the content you will want translated. To keep all conversations on track you likely want to use the same sample you use for testing Stilo Migrate and OptimizeR.

Talk to several companies. You will find each one has different procedures, tools, and content specialties. You are looking for the company with the best fit with DITA, your content, and the capacity for the expected translation load. To minimize the technology load at your end you will most likely want to deal with a company that can handle DITA as the input to translation workflow.

However, some translation companies require XLIFF files as input to the process. If XLIFF is required ask the company about handling the conversion from DITA to XLIFF and back again. If you must generate XLIFF internally there are tools, like Fluenta, that may enable the conversion in both directions reliably.

One of the features you will want to explore with these suppliers is “translation memory”. Modern translation software can remember what has not changed and so does not need to be translated again. However, this memory can be complicated. Can I send the DITA files for an 800-page book to the supplier and expect them to manage the translation memory? Some CCMS’ and CMS’ can handle sending just the changed files. Does that fit in with the translation supplier’s workflow?

 

Step Three: Talk to Component Content Management System (CCMS) and Content Management System (CMS) companies

If you are already using a CCMS or CMS you may find the system is already optimized for efficient translation from a DITA source.

If you are in the market for a CMS or CCMS pay close attention to how the system will help you manage translation. Some systems can deal directly with translation companies over the internet.

In the pilot phase of a migration to DITA plus translation you likely don’t need a CMS or CCMS right away; you can use the file system instead. Using the file system in the early stages has two main advantages. The first is that it’s easier to conceptualize how all the pieces fit together before introducing a database system — it aids in learning. This will be a benefit when selecting a CCMS or CMS. Second, it makes interaction with outside suppliers easier; ZIP a folder with your content and send it out for review and discussion.

Here’s a typical folder structure for DITA in the filesystem:

 

Step Four: Translation companies have important things to say about writing

Translation may be necessary but is never easy. Ask your translation supplier(s) for advice on how to write English content that makes good translation possible. Grammar varies dramatically from language to the next. For example, in French tables are feminine but floors are masculine. In English tables and floors have no gender. That’s a trivial example. Apparently Finnish has 15 inflections for nouns. This thread, Product names and reuse: a very serious anti-pattern when translating documents, on the OASIS site gives an excellent summary of some of the problems related to DITA reuse. In other words, authoring, at the most basic level, can make translation more expensive. Be sure to explore this issue with potential translation suppliers.

 

Step Five: Translation companies have important things to say about DITA

Reuse, especially the more advanced reuse options in DITA, can cause problems and expense during translation. CONREF, DITAVAL, CONKEYREF, HREF all have special caveats when interacting with translation companies. It’s important to understand these limitations and opportunities before committing to a flavor of DITA or a specific translation partner.

 

Step Six: Start small

Back in step two I recommended developing a representative sample, in DITA, of your content. Use and refine that sample in all your dealings with suppliers. Having all the conversations based on the same sample will make the final choices much easier.

Starting small also has the benefit of making mistakes easier to fix. Just like Stilo Migrate‘s ability to let you iteratively approach the perfect migration from MS Word, say, to DITA, a good sample of content will allow you to manage the iterative approach to a complete DITA plus translation system in your company.

 

Conclusion

Converting from a legacy authoring platform to DITA is one thing, converting to DITA plus translation is entirely different. Suddenly you are not trying to optimize for internal requirements but internal and external optimizations simultaneously. The more planning you can do for this external and internal optimization the better. It may add six months to the planning phase of a transition to DITA but will pay off big time in avoided costs and maximized efficiency.

 

Not recommendations but good sources …

The following are the best sources of general information on translation I’ve found this week. Please don’t take these links or other links above as recommendations! They’re just good information I’ve found.

How To Translate DITA Projects [Step-By-Step Guide]

Translating your DITA Project

 

About the Author

Peter Fournier has extensive experience in the BNR/Nortel documentation space. In the late 80’s and early 90’s he studied the feasibility of moving the Technical Documentation to SGML. He later developed, with his team and advanced online help system for Network Management and other software produced by Nortel. The core of the online help software was based on SGML principles of containerization but only had five or six base elements, and a lot of attributes.  It was engineered to be compatible with SGML so the group had no trouble generating valid XML when the draft standard appeared in late 1996 or early 1997.  In 2005 he discovered, with great joy, DITA XML. He introduced DITA to JDSU (now Lumentum) in 2008 and served as DITA manager and technical prime until 2018.  Between 2010 and 2014 he  also found  time to get a startup going and developed software to assist groups of 1 to 20 people to get into DITA and manage all the background complexity, including publication.  As of 2021 he’s back in the DITA space and loving the Stilo philosophy of making highly complex transformation software easily accessible to customers.


Simplifying Complex Conversions to DITA XML

 

By Peter Fournier

DITA XML conversion projects can fail simply because they get too complicated. Major stumbling blocks leading to complexity include:

  • Too many styles, sometimes running into the hundreds in large document suites.
  • Badly applied styles for example a “Heading 1” followed by a “Heading 4”.
  • A “Normal” paragraph manually formatted to look like something else.
  • Inconsistent content such as multiple ways to label procedures, for example “To clean XYZ” and “Cleaning XYZ”.

Because of these and many other problems it has been very common to cleanup a suite before converting to DITA XML and often doing post-conversion cleanup as well. Pre- and post-cleanup can be the most time consuming, complex, hard to manage and expensive part of a conversion project.

Enter Stilo’s Migrate software. For instance, suppose we have a list in a document that looks like this:

In Microsoft Word, or any other WYSIWIG editor, all the program knows is that

  • this text contains a heading (maybe),
  • paragraphs, some of which are in a numbered list,
  • and formatting to make the text look the way it does.

Migrate assists in the automated conversion to DITA XML by helping you create conversion rules and enhance the final DITA XML output.  For example, you can create:

  1. A rule that detects the fact that the first word in the heading ends in “ing”, indicating it is probably a task heading. It, and the subsequent text will be placed in a “task” topic. The paragraph will be placed in a “title” element.
  2. However sometimes a heading isn’t really a heading it just looks that way, it’s a manually formatted “Normal” paragraph. That’s OK.  You can create a rule that detects the manual formatting and the applies rule 1 above.
  3. A rule that adds a registered trademark symbol to the first occurrence of the word “QuickTrace”.
  4. A rule that detects that some paragraphs are numbered and that these should be wrapped in “steps/step/command” elements.
  5. A rule that detects that the word following the word “Click” is likely a UI element. The word following “Click” will be wrapped in a “uicontrol” span.
  6. However, sometimes the word “Click” is followed by a word that is in turn followed by a “→” character in which case the whole string with embedded arrows will be wrapped in “menucascade/uicontrol” elements.
  7. A rule that detects that a paragraph before the actual steps should be wrapped in a “context” element.
  8. A rule that detects that the last paragraph is indented at the same level as the numbered list and is not followed by another list item. Therefore, it should be wrapped in a “result/p” element.

The final result of the conversion to DITA will look like this:

So, starting with just formatted paragraphs you can create enriched, valid DITA XML, as you can see in the picture — and avoid, perhaps eliminate, pre- and post-cleanup.

To get a better idea of just how enriched the DITA XML really is here is the file that generated the improved output:

Note that the “→” character isn’t present in the XML, it’s added as part of generating the output.

The next time Migrate encounters a task formatted this way it will know what to do. That makes your conversion project simpler, more accurate and faster as you go along.

 

About the Author

Peter Fournier has extensive experience in the BNR/Nortel documentation space. In the late 80’s and early 90’s he studied the feasibility of moving the Technical Documentation to SGML. He later developed, with his team and advanced online help system for Network Management and other software produced by Nortel. The core of the online help software was based on SGML principles of containerization but only had five or six base elements, and a lot of attributes.  It was engineered to be compatible with SGML so the group had no trouble generating valid XML when the draft standard appeared in late 1996 or early 1997.  In 2005 he discovered, with great joy, DITA XML. He introduced DITA to JDSU (now Lumentum) in 2008 and served as DITA manager and technical prime until 2018.  Between 2010 and 2014 he  also found  time to get a startup going and developed software to assist groups of 1 to 20 people to get into DITA and manage all the background complexity, including publication.  As of 2021 he’s back in the DITA space and loving the Stilo philosophy of making highly complex transformation software easily accessible to customers.


LavaCon 2021 | October 24-27, Virtual

We will be exhibiting virtually at LavaCon 2021, the19th annual content strategy conference that is scheduled for 24–27 October.

LavaCon started in Hawaii (hence our name) to help organizations generate revenue and reduce costs using state-of-the-art content technologies.

However, LavaCon is more than just a conference. It’s a gathering place where content professionals share best practices and lessons learned, network with peers, and build professional relationships that will last for years to come.

“LavaCon is my favorite content conference—it’s the most cutting edge and best mix of people.”
JB, Director of Content, Juniper Networks

 

The 2021 Featured Speakers include:

  • SHEILA O’HARA, Principal Content Design Manager, Microsoft
  • STACEY KING GORDON, UX Content Strategy Manager, Google
  • MARA POMETTI, Lead AI Content Strategist, IBM
  • KAT PARK, Designer, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech
  • RACHEL ROUMELIOTIS, VP of Content Strategy, O’Reilly Media
  • EMMELYN WANG, Global Business Development Leader, Amazon Web Services
  • EESHITA GROVER, Director, Marketing, Cisco Systems
  • STEFAN GENTZ, Senior Worldwide Evangelist, Adobe TCS
  • ERICA JORGENSEN, Senior Content Manager, Microsoft
  • NOZ URBINA, Omnichannel Content Designer, Urbina Consulting
  • SELENE DE LA CRUZ, Content Design Director, Mastercard
  • COLIN BUDD, Global Design Strategist, IBM
  • KAREN BROTHERS, Content Management Specialist, 3M
  • JENNIFER KEMPER, Director, Content Strategy, AmerisourceBergen
  • MARLI MESIBOV, Lead Content Strategist, Verily Life Sciences
  • STACEY GORSKI, Director, Medical Excellence & Strategic Projects, Sanofi Pasteur
  • DAVID DYLAN THOMAS, Author, Design for Cognitive Bias
  • PHYLISE BANNER, Associate Director, Instructional Design, Emeritus
  • DR. CLARK SHAH-NELSON, Assistant Dean, Instructional Design and Technology, University of Maryland
  • NOEL WURST, Sr. Manager, Communications, SmartBear

 

Visit the conference website for further information and to register.